Species Highlight “Dendrobates Tinctorius Bakhuis”

I chose the Dendrobates Tinctorius Bakhuis as my third species highlight because it was my third and latest type of frog.  They make very good starter frogs seeing that they are very hardy, entertaining and due to their colors they are easy to keep an eye on.

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Found:

The Bakhuis was originally found in Suriname- more specifically the Bakhuis mountain – hence the name!

 

Behavior:

Bold frog which does well in groups.  They are a terrestrial frog, but will climb if space allows.  These frogs behaviors may change as they reach maturity (10-12 months).  Females may fight once they reach maturity, so it is recommended to keep them in pairs or keep a close eye on them when they reach maturity.

Size:

Female Bakhuis frogs are around 1.25″.  Male Bakhuis frogs are smaller at around an inch.

Temperature & Humidity:

The Bakhuis’ like the humidity range to be 70-100% with a temperature between 60 and 80 degrees F.  The ideal temperature would be mid to low 70’s as poison dart frogs in general are very sensitive to heat.

Feeding:

They love insects.  In the wild they will eat ants, termites, tiny beetles, crickets, spiders and any other small insect.  In captivity, they are normally fed flightless fruit flies, pinhead crickets, isopods & springtails.  In captivity, their diet should be dusted with a vitamin supplement in order to give them the nutrients they need.

 Breeding:

The Bakhuis is pretty easy to breed.  If the conditions are right, eggs will be left on a smooth broad leaf, or under a cocohut.  The eggs will then hatch into tadpoles, which will take 60-80 days.

 

The Bakhuis is a very cool morph of dart frog.  They are bold, easily bred and are one of the smaller types of the Tinctorius family.

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