Species Highlight “Fire Bellied Toad” with pictures

Today is Day 3 of the #30PostshathSept challenge.  There is still time for you to vote on yesterday’s poll about what to do with my old tank. Take a peek & let me know what you think : https://thefroglady.wordpress.com/2015/09/02/what-to-do-with-this-old-tank/

Now for the species highlight on the Fire bellied Toad!   This was one of the first frogs that I was looking at getting when I was buying a tank.  These guys are pretty cool and I love the awesome set-ups that you can have for the Fire Bellied Toads.

Also known as :  Bombina orientalis

fireBellyToad_D

Photo Credit:Petco

Found:

The bombina orientalis is found in northeastern China, throughout Korea & parts of Russia.

Behavior:

Fire bellied toads are always active and are diurnal.  They can be aggressive with smaller tank mates & may try to eat other animals.  A minimum of 5 gallons of tank space per toad is recommended.  These frogs are semi-aquatic; the perfect tank would consist of   1/2-2/3 land area and the remainder of the tank to be water area.

semiaquatic_setup03 semiaquatic_setup04

Photo Credits: Amphibian Care

The red belly of these frogs is midly toxic.  Like with any frog, handling should be kept to a minimum and wash your hands after contact.

Size:

Adult length of the Bombina Orientalis is around 2.5″.  Sexing can be difficult, but females typically have a fuller build with males being more slender.

Temperature & Humidity:

70-75 degrees F day time temperature w/ 60-68 degree night time temperature

These frogs love high humidity.

Feeding:

The Fire Bellied Toad will eat almost anything that moves.  Including: crickets, mealworms, wax worms, earth worms, small feeder fish such as guppies and bloodworms.  These frogs enjoy having a diet of many different meal items, this also gives them the required nutrition.  They should be fed every other day due to their high metabolism.  All foods should be supplemented with a calcium supplement w/ D3 at every meal and a reptile multi-vitamin a couple times a month.

Breeding:

Males croak to attract females and begin mating when a female gets within jumping distance.  Eggs are usually attached to submerged plants and hatch as quickly as 10 days.  It will then take around 3 months for them to metamophasize.

Threats:

According to the ICUN red list, this species is threatned by habitat loss and degradation.  In Russia, the collection of animals for traditional Chinese medicine might also be a threat.  Moderate numbers are exported into the international pet trade.

icun red list threat

Here are some more photos because they are so cute!

oriental firebellied toad on leaf, china green frog

Photo Credit : Reptile Centre

tumblr_m9momyepP41ru1jh1o1_500

Photo Credit: Art In Motion Pets

fire-bellied-toad

Photo Credit: RealMagick

Do you have any of these Fire Bellied Toads in your collection?

Note:  I do not own the right to the photos

If you missed them:

Types of Leucs with pictures

Types of Tincs with pictures

Types of Auratus with pictures

thefroglady

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References:

http://zoomed.com/cm/resources-stuff/Care%20Sheet/fb_FireBellyToad.html

http://www.reptilecentre.com/files_care-sheet-fire-bellied-toad

http://www.amphibiancare.com/frogs/caresheets/firebelliedtoad.html

http://www.petsuppliesplus.com/content.jsp?pageName=fire_bellied_toad

http://www.backwaterreptiles.com/reptile-care-sheets/fire-bellied-toad-care-sheet.html

http://www.lllreptile.com/info/library/animal-care-sheets/amphibians/-/fire-belly-toads/

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2 thoughts on “Species Highlight “Fire Bellied Toad” with pictures

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