Native Frogs to USA- Cricket Frogs (Part 2)

Today is the second post in the series of frogs native to the US.  I have decided to raise some awareness of some awesome species that the US has due to the overwhelming amount of frogs from other countries that I have been featuring lately.

Part 1 was on American Toads!  Check it out here!  Today’s post we will see the Cricket Frogs.  They are called the cricket frog because their call sounds like a cricket!

A. crepitans – Northern Cricket Frog

Northern_Cricket_Frog.jpg

Image from Wikimedia Commons

Size-0.75″-1.5″

Description-  The Northern Cricket Frog coloring will vary from grey to greens to browns.  However, typically there is a dark banding on the legs and a white bar from the eye to the base of the foreleg.

northern cricket range.jpg

Image from ICUN Redlist

These frogs prefer the edges of slow-moving permanent bodies of water, including but not limited to muddy banks of shallow streams.  The northern cricket frog is weird because it does not have any toe pads, although they have very long legs and can jump more than 3′ in a single jump.(1) (2) (3)

A. gryllus – Southern Cricket Frog

Southern_Cricket_frog

Image from Wikimedia Commons

Size-0.75″-1.5″

Description-  The Southern Cricket Frog’s coloring varies from brown, red, green or grey, but all have a bright stripe of color running from the tip of the snout and down their backs, broken by a triangle pattern between the eyes.  This frog can jump over 60 times its body length when jumping upward!  This helps them avoid predators.

southern cricket range.jpg
Like the northern cricket frog, the southern cricket frog can be found in areas will shallow bodies of water, including ponds, creeks & wetlands.
The southern cricket frog will vary from the northern cricket frog in that the southern will have longer legs, less webbing on its hind feet and a more pointed snout.  The southern cricket frog will also have a more defined line on its back than the northern cricket frog.  (1) (2) (3)

 

 

Have you seen any of these cricket frogs where you live?  Leave a comment & where you live if you have!

 

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9 thoughts on “Native Frogs to USA- Cricket Frogs (Part 2)

  1. Haven’t seen any of these frogs, but I wasn’t looking either. When I used to visit my late mother’s house in Tennessee I used to hear plenty of sounds at night, some which I’m sure were some kind of frogs. In the evenings I’d sit for hours on her back deck talking with my family as a symphony of wild sounds serenaded us in the background. Such wonderful times!

    Arlee Bird
    A to Z Challenge Co-host
    Tossing It Out

  2. attached is a pamphlet of frog species on the mornington peninsula victoria australia i am interested in any literature you may be used to teach children of all ages and to be adapted for teaching the public like your site photos for your use

    On 10 February 2016 at 05:49, The Frog Lady wrote:

    > thefroglady posted: “Today is the second post in the series of frogs > native to the US. I have decided to raise some awareness of some awesome > species that the US has due to the overwhelming amount of frogs from other > countries that I have been featuring lately. Part 1 was on” >

    1. Do you have a link to the pamphlet? I don’t think wordpress will allow uploads. I personally have not created any literature. However let me know what you are looking for and I can see if its something I could do or if I know someone who could.

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