B is for…Hypsiboas boans

Today is the second day of April’s A to Z Challenge.  I will be writing about different frog species based on their latin species names!  See the introduction here:

 

Hypsiboas boans -Gladiator Tree Frog

These tree frogs are very large and may also be known as the Giant Tree Frog, as they can range up to 4.5″ in length!

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Upon hearing the males mating call, the female H. Boans tree frogs will approach the male and inspect his nest area.  The females are said to be very picky and usually will reject the male ~ 50% of the time.

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These tree frogs possess a sharp bony structure called a prepollex spine that grows from their wrist and is located near their thumbs.  This bone is covered in skin, except the tip is exposed.  During mating, the males are very aggressive and will often charge with their exposed spine trying to cut or stab the opponent male in the eyes or eardrums.  Hence the name Gladiator Tree frogs.

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  Pretty cool frogs!  Hope you enjoyed Letter B.  Stay tuned for letter C!

 

Sources:

(1) The Night Tour – Costa Rica  (2) Hypsiboas Boans Online Guide

Image Sources:

(1) Photo by Gianfranco Gomez  (2) RTPI affliate Sean Graesser  (3) Flickr user Sea Chest

 

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35 thoughts on “B is for…Hypsiboas boans

  1. Hi there!

    I’m stopping by from the #AtoZChallenge. I like animals and I like your frogs…;~)

    I have two blogs in this challenge…my author blog at THE STORY CATCHER (www.donnalmartin.com) and my KICKS Kids Club blog (www.kickskidsclub.blogspot.com) . If you get a chance, check them out and good luck with the challenge!

    Donna L Martin

  2. I miss my tree frogs. I had them living in Arkansas. Now living in Ecuador I don’t have them anymore. Well, Ecuador isn’t the problem, living in the city in the Andes is the problem, but I enjoyed your post. It reminded me of the little critters I was fond of.
    @ScarlettBraden from
    Frankly Scarlett

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