Oklahoma Frogs and Toads

***This post is a part of my series where this year I will be highlighting all of the different states native frogs and toads.  Check out this page to see all of the United State’s native frogs broken down by state. ***

Here are the frogs  and Toads that can be found in Oklahoma:

American Bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus)

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The American Bullfrog is the largest frog in Oklahoma.  They are typically green or gray-brown with brown spots. They can grow up to 6″ in length and weigh up to a 1 pound.  The bullfrog can be found near large permanent bodies of water with vegetation near the shorelines. In Oklahoma, they can be found statewide.

Bullfrogs will eat almost anything that will fit in their mouths.  They have been known to eat spiders, fish, birds and even small mammals.  It has a very deep call which resembles the mooing of a cow.  Watch the video below to hear!  Both genders of the bullfrog croak.  Their calls may be heard day or night between May and August.

Blanchard’s Cricket Frog (Acris crepitans blanchardi)

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The Blanchard’s Cricket frog measures an average of 1.5″ in length with the females being slightly larger.  These frogs can jump a surprisingly long way (5-6′) for their small size.  They can range a combination of black, yellow orange or red on a base of brown or green.  The Blanchard’s Cricket frog can be found everywhere except the penninsula in Oklahoma.  They may be found near permanent water sources like slow moving streams, margins of lakes and ponds or around marshy areas.

This frog was named for its breeding call which sounds very much like a chirp or trill of a cricket repeated for about 20 beats or like 2 pebbles clicked together.  Listen to its call below.

Boreal Chorus Frog (Pseudacris maculata)

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The Boreal Chorus frog is brown with 3 dark lateral stripes or spots down its back with a white upper lip and measures up to 1-1/2″ long. These frogs are typically found near heavily vegetated bodies of water, but also need a shallow open area for breeding.  These frogs may be found in the eastern corner of Oklahoma’s pennisula.

The boreal chorus frog sounds similar to the spring peeper in that it sounds like fingers running over a comb, however the boreal chorus frog’s call is more tinny and mechanical opposed to the musical whistle of the spring peeper.  Females lay 500-1,500 eggs in groups of 5-300.  Listen to the call below.

Bronze Frog (Lithobates clamitans clamitans)

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The bronze frog is typically brown or bronze with dark mottling on its head, chest and under its legs and a yellow lip and throat.  The bronze frog is similar to the bullfrog, however the bullfrog is larger and lacks the skin fold behind the eye to mid torso.   The Bronze frog is only seen in the eastern half of Oklahoma.

These frogs can produce as many as 6 different calls – however the most distinctive sound is a throaty boink that sounds like a loose banjo string being plucked.  Listen to the video below to hear!

Cajun Chorus Frog (Pseudacris fouquettei)

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The Cajun chorus frog can reach sizes of up to 1-1/4″. They have 3 broad dark stripes down their back and a white stripe along its upper lip. The frog is named in honor or M. J. “Jack” Fouquette of ASU – he was an expert in frog vocalizations. The cajun chorus frog can be found in the eastern half of Oklahoma; typically in open wetlands, flooded fields, etc.

The cajun chorus frog sounds like fingers running over a comb and can be heard February – April.  Females lay 500-1,500 eggs in groups of 5-300. Tadpoles will become frogs within 6-8 weeks. In the winter, these frogs burrow into the ground and like wood frogs, they generate a type of antifreeze glycol to protect their organs. Listen to the call below.

Cope’s Gray Treefrog (Hyla chrysoscelis)

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The Cope’s gray treefrog is smaller and smoother skinned than the gray treefrog.  The gray treefrog and Cope’s gray treefrog can be difficult to tell apart during breeding while they are both mottled.  However, most of the time the Cope’s gray treefrog has a solid lime green colored back.  It can be found across most of the eastern area of Oklahoma.

Another way the Cope’s gray treefrog can be distinguished from the gray treefrog is by its call.  The Cope’s gray treefrog’s call is short and raspy.  Listen to the video below to hear.

Couch’s Spadefoot (Scaphiopus couchii)

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The couch’s spadefoot has a dull yellow to greenish yellow coloring with brown-black spots and can reach up to 3″ in length.  They can be found in areas with prairie grassland and breed in pools and ponds filled by heavy rain.  In Oklahoma, they can be found in the southeastern corner of the state.

Couch’s spadefoot has a yeow croaking call.

Dwarf American Toad (Anaxyrus americanus charlesmithi)

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The dwarf American toad is mainly nocturnal and is most active when the weather is warm and humid. During the winter, the toad will burrow deep into the ground below the frost line.  As the frost line gets deeper, the toads will burrow deeper beneath the ground.    The Eastern American toad prefers rocky and wood areas and will become active at dusk.  The dwarf subspecies can be found throughout the eastern half of Oklahoma.

The toad has a high musical trill which can last upwards of 30 seconds.  The dwarf American toad is highly terrestrial and can only be found in the water for a short period while breeding and laying eggs.

East Texas Toad (Bufo velatus)

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The East Texas Toad has a uniform yellowish-brown, greenish-brown or black coloration with a light colored belly. They average 2-3″ in length. They can be found in the southeastern corner of Oklahoma. It is thought by many researchers that it is a sub-species of the Woodhouse’s toad.

The East Texas Toad will call from March through August. The call is similar to the Woodhouse’s toad heard below:

Eastern American Toad (Anaxyrus americanus americanus)

The Eastern American toad and the dwarf American toad are very similar.  The differences between the dwarf American toad and Eastern American toad are the dwarf American toad is smaller (2″ or less), reddish brown and has few dark spots on the back.

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The Eastern American toad is mainly nocturnal and is most active when the weather is warm and humid. During the winter, the toad will burrow deep into the ground below the frost line.  As the frost line gets deeper, the toads will burrow deeper beneath the ground.    The Eastern American toad prefers rocky and wood areas and will become active at dusk. They can be found throughout the eastern half of the state.

The toad has a high musical trill which can last upwards of 30 seconds.  American toad is highly terrestrial and can only be found in the water for a short period while breeding and laying eggs.  Below is a video that shows the American Toad calling.

Eastern Green Toad (Bufo debilis)

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Another name for this eastern green toad is the Chihuahuan Toad. This toad is a very unique shade of green with small black spots and irregular lines.  It can reach around 2″ in length.  This toad spends most of its life underground and emerges to breed in pools after heavy rains in late spring or summer.  They can be found in the plains grasslands in Cimarron county within Oklahoma.

The green toad’s call is a flat buzz that lasts from 2-8 seconds.  Listen to him go below:

Eastern narrow mouth toad (Gastrophryne carolinensis)**

**Although it bears the name of “toad” it is actually considered to be a frog.

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This frog is typically 1″ in length, with females being slightly larger.  One defining characteristic of this frog is the fold of skin on the back of the frogs head.  The eastern narrow mouth toad is grey or brown in color with smooth thick skin.  It can be found in grassy areas on rocky slopes and in rock filled canyons.  They will hide under rocks and can sometimes be found with tarantulas.  As shown in the photo below, they can be found in the eastern half of Oklahoma – typically under flat rocks.

The male eastern narrow mouth toad’s belly will create a substance that will stick the mating pair together.  The female will lay up to 850 eggs on the surface of the water.  They will take 2 days to hatch and will be toadlets within a quick 30-60 days.  It’s call sounds similar to a bleating sheep with a baaaaa.  Several calling frogs together sound like bees or a bunch of toy airplanes.  I was very surprised by the pitch of their call.  Have a listen below:

Great Plains narrow mouth toad (Gastrophryne olivacea)**

**Although it bears the name of “toad” it is actually considered to be a frog.

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This frog is typically 1.5″ in length, with females being slightly larger.  One defining characteristic of this frog is the fold of skin on the back of the frogs head.  The great plain narrow mouth toad is grey or brown in color with smooth thick skin.  It can be found in grassy areas on rocky slopes and in rock filled canyons.  They will hide under rocks and can sometimes be found with tarantulas.  As shown in the photo below, they can be found in the most of Oklahoma.

The great plains narrow mouth toad’s call is a nasal buzz lasting only 1-4 seconds.  Several calling frogs together sound like bees or a bunch of toy airplanes.  I was very surprised by the pitch of their call.

Great Plains Toad (Anaxyrus cognatus)

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The great plains toad has numerous warts and prominent ridges on its head.  The females will typically reach 3″ with males being less.  The great plains toad can be found throughout Oklahoma.  They burrow well in loose soil and are found at night roadside or in ditches where insects are bountiful.

A female great plains toad will lay up to 20,000 eggs.  The male great plains toad has a long trill call that lasts 20-50 seconds long and can vary depending on the size of the male and the temperature.  Some people have compared this toad’s call to a jackhammer, but go ahead and listen to it for yourself below:

Green Treefrog (Hyla cinerea)

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The green treefrog is slender frog that ranges from bright green to dull green with a white stripe down its side.  These frogs can reach 2.5″ and can be easily frightened.  They are typically found within marshes, swamps, small ponds and streams, but can also be found within brackish water sources.  Sadly much of this species preferred habitat has been destroyed.

On average, a female will lay 400 eggs.  Breeding takes place May through July.  It has been noted that the green treefrog will choose its prey not based on size, but based on activity level.  With the most active being eaten first.  The male’s call is a single note repeated over and over sounding like a “queenk”.  Listen to their call below.

Hurter’s Spadefoot (Scaphiopus hurterii)

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The Hurter’s spadefoot is typically a greenish color, however the color does vary. There are 2 light dorsal lines on its moist skin and a bump behind his eyes. This species prefers sandy soil in a wooded area. It will typically be burrowed underground. It’s range within Oklahoma is the eastern portion of the state.

Breeding will take place in temporary pools that form during heavy rain. The Hurter’s spadefoot’s call is a loud grunt. Take a listen to it below:

New Mexico Spadefoot (Spea multiplicata)

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This spadefoot is similar to other spadefoots with vertical pupils, wedge spade on its back feet.  It can be gray or brown with numerous dark spots reaching up to 2.5″ in length.  They can be found in Oklahoma’s pennisula and the northern portion of the state in grasslands or semi-desert shurbland.

The New Mexico spadefoot’s call is a stuttering croak that varies in length and duration with increased temperature.

Northern Crawfish Frog (Lithobates areolatus circulosus)

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This frog has a large and stubby body with a distinct humped back while it rests.  It is covered in many irregular shaped spots and its belly is solid white.  It gets its name from its diet which consists of nocturnal beetles, small amphibians and reptiles and crawfish.  The crawfish frog can be found in low lying areas including meadows, prairies, brush fields and crawfish holes.  In Oklahoma, their range is scattered within the eastern portion of the state.

The crawfish frog breed from late February through April.  The males will gather in a fishless pond and call.  The females can lay up to 7000 eggs group in large 5-6″ clumps.  The pond must maintain through mid-June while all of the froglets transform.  The crawfish frog has a loud and deep call which reminds me of a hog.  Listen to them below:

Northern Green Frog (Lithobates clamitans melanota)

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The green frog is typically greenish-brown with dark mottling on its head, chest and under its legs.  The throat color ranges to yellow for a male to white for the females.  The green frog is similar to the bullfrog, however the bullfrog is larger and lacks the skin fold behind the eye to mid torso.   The Green Frog is seen on the eastern portion of the state of Oklahoma.

These frogs can produce as many as 6 different calls – however the most distinctive sound is a throaty boink that sounds like a loose banjo string being plucked.  Listen to the video below to hear!

Pickerel Frog (Lithobates palustris)

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The Pickerel frog looks very similar to the Northern Leopard frog; however the pickerel frog has 2 parallel rows of squareish spots down its back.  They are often found near beaver ponds with dense vegetation.  The pickerel frog may be found in the eastern edge of the state of Oklahoma.

Female pickerel frogs lay between 700-2,900 eggs in a globular mass attached to a submerged stick or stem.  The tadpoles will transform into frogs around mid-July based on water temperature.  As a defense the skin of the pickerel frog produces a toxic substance which makes them unappealing to most predators.  Listen to the video below to hear their call.  It sounds similar to a low and slow snore.

Plains Leopard Frog (Lithobates blairi)

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This frog is brown with large rounded dark spots with light borders.  As you can see from the photo above, the ear drum is very distinct.  The Plains leopard frog is known for its distinctively broken and displaced skin ridges along the back and can reach 3-3/4″.  They can be found near streams, ponds, creeks and ditches.  In wet, mild weather, they may be found far away from water.  The range of the Plain’s leopard frog is the eastern half of Oklahoma.

Female plains leopard frogs will lay a mass of eggs which can hold up to 6,500 eggs.  Tadpoles will become frogs in midsummer or may even transform the following spring.  The plains leopard frog’s call includes a few low grunting sounds along with a series of short clucks.  Listen to their call below:

Plains Spadefoot (Spea bombifrons)

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The Plains spadefoot is known for its vertically elongated pupil and markings similar to a hourglass on its upper sides.  The spadefoot may have some green on its back and sides and some tiny reddish warts.  On the underside of each hind foot, there is a wedge shaped spade.  They can be found almost statewide within Oklahoma.

The plains spadefoot spends most of its life buried in the soil, but will emerge to breed after heavy rains in spring or summer.  The plains spadefoot is an explosive breeder and many frogs will appear suddenly after a heavy rain.  A female can produce up to 2,000 eggs which will hatch in a few days.  They produce a compound in their blood which keep their blood from freezing in the winter.  The call of the plains spadefoot is a brief snoring sound.  Take a listen below.

Red Spotted Toad (Bufo punctatus)

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The red-spotted toad is unique due to its gray or brown coloring and red/orange warts.  They can reach 3″ in length and can be found in rocky canyons and streams or burrowing under rocks.  Typically found in the western portion of Oklahoma as shown below.

The red-spotted toad has an unusually high pitched trill which can last 3-12 seconds.  During the breeding season, the males throat color may darken.

Southern Crawfish Frog (Lithobates areolatus)

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This frog has a large and stubby body with a distinct humped back while it rests.  It is covered in many irregular shaped spots and its belly is solid white.  It gets its name from its diet which consists of nocturnal beetles, small amphibians and reptiles and crawfish.  The crawfish frog can be found in low lying areas including meadows, prairies, brush fields and crawfish holes. The southern Crawfish frog can be found within the eastern 1/3 of Oklahoma.

The crawfish frog breed from late February through April.  The males will gather in a fishless pond and call.  The females can lay up to 7000 eggs group in large 5-6″ clumps.  The pond must maintain through mid-June while all of the froglets transform.  The crawfish frog has a loud and deep call which reminds me of a hog.  Listen to them below:

Southern Leopard Frog (Lithobates sphenocephalus)

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The southern leopard frog is a greenish brown color and has 2 yellow lines down the back and one above the lip.  These frogs can be found in shallow freshwater or slightly brackish water.  They are usually found a powerful jump or two away from the water, however in summer they may be found far from the water where they venture for insects.  They can be found in the eastern and central areas of Oklahoma.

The southern leopard frogs call sounds like a squeaky balloon or chuckling croak.  Females may deposit 3,000-5,000 eggs in cluster within the water.  Listen below to hear their call.

Spotted Chorus Frog (Pseudacris clarkii)

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The spotted chorus frog is a small nocturnal treefrog which is typically grey or olive green in color with green mottling pattern that can reach up to 1.25″ in length. They are typically found in grasslands and prairies. In Oklahoma, they can be found in the central half of the state.

The spotted chorus frog will breed from January to early June and has been known to go into October if the conditions are right. Their call is a loud, medium pitched rapid whank whank whank sound. Listen to their call below:

Spring Peeper (Pseudacris crucifer)

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The  spring peeper is one of Missouri’s smallest frogs measuring from 3/4″ to 1-1/4″.  It can be distinguished by it’s dark colored “X”across its back.  This frog is common on the eastern edge of the state of Oklahoma in woods next to vegetated swamps and marshes.  It has been threatened in states where the wetland habitat has shrunk.

It’s chorus of a shrill high pitched call can be heard from up to a 1/2 mile away!  Listen to its call in the video below.  The peeper is one of the earliest frog species to breed in the area beginning as early as late February during warm spells.  Similar to the American toad, these frogs spend most of its time on land and only are in the water to breed and lay eggs.  Like most tree frogs, the spring peeper is nocturnal and loves to hunt ants, spiders and other small insects during the evening.

Strecker’s Chorus Frog (Pseudacris streckeri)

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The Strecker’s chorus frog can reach 1.5″. They range in color from light grey, brown, green and have long blotches and typically has a dark strip from their eye to their shoulder. The belly is typically white with yellow or orange around their groin. They can be found in the eastern portion of Oklahoma.

Their call sounds like a single note repeated. Sounds like a bell like whistle.

Texas Toad (Anaxyrus speciosus)

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The Texas Toad is brown with yellow-green spots and can reach up to 3.5″ in length. It can be found in the southwestern and central areas of Oklahoma.

The call of the Texas toad is an explosive trill that lasts for 1-1.5 seconds each. Listen to its call below:

Western Bird Voiced Tree Frog (Hyla avivoca avivoca)

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The Western Bird-Voiced treefrog is highly variable and can change colors, however it is typically shades of gray and green with yellow-green inside its legs. They have a distinctive white/ yellowish spot under their eye. They can be found in and around swamps and swampy lakes. In Oklahoma, they can be found in the extreme southeastern counties as shown below.

They breed from April-June using branches hung over water. Their call is very bird-like, hence the name, with 2-5 whistles per second. Listen to it below:

Western Green Toad (Bufo debilis insidior)

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The Western green toad is a small toad that is green with yellow-green and black spots. They can reach up to 2″ in length. This toad is primarily nocturnal and lives in rodent burrows.

Males may be heard calling during the day at peak summer breeding season. Listen to their call below.

Wood Frog (Lithobates sylvaticus)

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The Wood frog is known as a brown, tan or rust colored frog with a dark colored around its eyes.  Some call it a “robbers mask”.  They average from 1-1/2 to 2-3/4″.  These frogs are found in the extreme eastern portion of Oklahoma as shown below.

Their call sounds like a quacking of a duck.  Watch the video below to hear!  Three interesting facts about the wood frog, is that while the frogs do not show any paternal care to their young, it has been discovered that tadpoles that have been separated from parents can pick their parents out and aggregate around them.  Secondly, the wood frog is very tolerable to cold temperatures.  These frogs can tolerate complete freezing of up to 65% of their body as they pump any water within their body to their extremities and at the same time pump large amount of glucose from the liver into their cells.  This creates a syrupy sugar solution which acts as antifreeze within their body.  Their blood will freeze, the heart will stop beating and all breathing and muscle movements cease until early spring as they begin to thaw and re-animate.  Lastly, all the male wood frogs will gather in a fishless pond or pool to call from sundown to midnight.  After 2-3 nights all eggs will be laid and all wood frogs will leave the area.  The wood frog can live to be 10 years old.

Woodhouse’s Toad (Anaxyrus woodhousii woodhousii)

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Woodhouse’s toad can vary in color from yellowish brown to greenish grey with a light stripe down the middle of its back.  They can reach up to 4″ in length!  These toads can be found throughout Oklahoma. They burrow into soil to escape drought and cold.  Woodhouse’s toads are named after a 19th century explorer and naturalist Samuel Woodhouse ( Formally called the Rocky Mountain toads).

These toads breed from late March to mid-May in marshes, rain pools and other areas lacking strong current.  This toad’s call is a loud wahhhhhh lasting between 1-4 seconds and emitted several times a minute. This call is similar to the Fowler’s toad, but with a slightly lower pitch.

Thanks for reading! Check out all of the United State’s native frogs and toads here.

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Photo Credits:

Cover photo used by the creative commons license.  Text was added.  See Original photo by Jonathon C. Wheeler here.

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